Posts Tagged ‘GIS’

Locate Potholes for Timely Management and Maintenance

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With the onslaught of snow and the weary winter weather, numerous potholes are popping up everywhere on roads and highways. Recently, there have been increasing reports of potholes. Potholes have even been causing many drivers to be stranded on roads and highways in the icy weather with flat tires. Potholes are also a potential cause of automobile accidents, traffic problems, and other types of car damage. Drivers are unaware of presence of potholes and danger that they are facing. pothole To better inform municipal governments and other drivers unaware of the presence and dangers of potholes, we have created a community map that can be accessed by the mobile web or via the Mappler app. There are two maps; for users in New Jersey and New York City. Community members can log details for potholes such as location, size, depth, width and approximate location of the pothole on the road. This information can be used by municipal governments to get to working on patching up the potholes and start easing road hazards. Please help us spread the word to get as many participants as possible! Share links NJ Potholes: http://mappler.net/njpothole NYC Potholes: http://mappler.net/nycpothole For more information, contact Wansoo Im at gis@vertices.com or (732) 418-9135.

India Prepares to Use GIS for Water Inventory

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Uttar Pradesh, a state in northern India, has a population of over 190 million making it India’s most populous state.  Water resource quality is a growing concern, and up until now has not been well documented in this area.  The State Water and Sanitation Mission (SWSM) will use GIS and GPS technologies to create a database of ponds, wells, and hand pumps which will be used to manage these water resources.  This mapping project is part of the National Rural Drinking Water Program.  The project is scheduled to begin by April 1 with an immediate focus on villages with very poor drinking water conditions in summer, and should last until around March 2012.  Community and organizational participation will be key after the initial inventory is done, to continuously monitor these resources. Source: Indian Express Scott Jablonski, VERTICES Intern

Using GIS for Efficient, Cost-Effective River Monitoring

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The Western Pennsylvania Conservancy (WPC) has been using GIS technology to quickly and effectively map and analyze data collected about lakes and rivers in western Pennsylvania.  Using a commercial fish-finder and Esri software products, the WPC was able to successfully generate extensive bathymetry data for 38.1 miles the Allegheny River in just 36 days.  Data was collected by the fish-finder in three second intervals and loaded into the GIS where it was used to create a raster bathymetry layer, which could then be used to create contour lines at any desired intervals.  This approach saved the WPC a significant amount of money and the collection methods allow for efficient remapping to monitor areas of special interest over time. Eli Long and Eric Chapman of the WPC noted in their report that “The bathymetry information WPC has collected will be used to prioritize further mussel survey locations and will be a vital part of the River Information System. Combined with river flow, the data can be used to model pollution concentrations, substrate shifts, and sediment deposition. The completed dataset will be a useful tool for a variety of end users from USACE to recreational boaters and academic researchers. With access to a dataset that was, until now, unavailable at this scale and level of detail, GIS users are limited only by their own creativity.” Read the Full Article by Eli Long and Eric Chapman of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Source: Esri Online News Scott Jablonski, VERTICES intern

Thornapple River Restoration Project

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The Thornapple River is the major river in the Thornapple River Watershed (TRW), a major subdivision of Grand River Watershed(GRW).  The GRW is the second largest drainage system in the state of Michigan, which flows into Lake Michigan.  The main channel of the Thornapple River is 78 miles long and flows in a general West/NorthWest direction.  The Thornapple River Restoration Project is responding to the environmental concerns after the Nashville Dam on the main channel of the Thornapple was removed, which drained 80 acres of water from its Mill Pond and exposed about 60 acres of floodplain.  With the aid of an interactive map, the work done and the progression of these areas can be documented visually.  This area is part of the Barry Conservation District, one of 80 conservation districts in the state of Michigan. Source: Thornapple River Restoration Project Scott Jablonski, VERTICES intern